The voice of persons with disability

PHNOM PENH – “Welcome to our Global Knowledge programme on the Voice of Persons with Disabilities broadcasting from Phnom Penh to Siem Reap province (FM92.25 MHz) and Preah Sihanouk province (FM88.75 MHz).”

Cambodia radio for persons with disability

From inside a crammed studio on the ground of a Buddhist pagoda, the announcement by Ms. Phoum Leakhena, an anchor, made debut for the first time a radio programme by and for people with disabilities. Its mission is to provide an airwave channel for them to make their voices heard and to promote their rights and opportunities as equal members in the Cambodian society.Radio for Persons with Disability

Disability in Cambodia

  • The number of people with disabilities is around 700,000 or 5 percent of the country’s population
  • People with disability face many barriers including physical, social, economic and attitudinal.
  • They lack access to appropriate, quality and affordable healthcare, rehabilitation, education and disability services.

Radio by and for persons with disabilities

Also One man’s story

Find more on global learning    http://bethinkglobal.com.au

 

 

Wanting our children to achieve global citizenship – do teachers have the skills to teach it?

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Research and experience tell me that parents, government leaders and business want young people to become active and responsible citizens of the world and to obtain jobs where interaction with people in other countries and from other cultures is productive and economically rewarding. Continue reading

They thought they would be hailed as heroes-connecting health, history and culture

It has been mEbola and death practiceore than a year since Liberia, a deeply religious country, embraced one of its biggest taboos, cremating bodies-to rein in the rampaging Ebola pandemic. Thirty young men have been shunned by their community.

http://nyti.ms/1mcDdAs

Find out more about burial practice, culture and Ebola with some discussion and critical thinking to explore at http://bit.ly/1IYEakQ

 

The Journey or the Destination

At a recent sports day for young children I reflected on the purpose and learning opportunities of the event.

Fun Run
The organisation of the morning was outstanding.  Every element from volunteer assistance, evacuation procedures, entertainment, medical facilities and choice of not for profits to support had been thought through in detail.
Lesson no 1:  My community will go to great lengths to make an event relevant to my age, ensure my safety and at the same time make it fun for me.  They will give me an opportunity to help others through my effort.
Children were registered by families and were sponsored by relatives and friends.  The proceeds of the morning were donated to a not for profit chosen by families from a small range that the organisers had thoughtfully selected.
Lesson no 2:  I can ask my loved ones to support my efforts to help others.
Events were offered in varying lengths and staggered across the morning.
Lesson no 3:  I have a chance of completing the event, feeling proud and fulfilling my commitment to my sponsors.
Toilets were brought in, sunscreen and water were on hand and even fruit was freely available.
Lesson no 4:  As a child my needs will be looked after.
Children ran, walked, were pushed and were held. Their adults walked dogs, pushed strollers, prams, supported and encouraged their children’s efforts. Bystanders offered words of praise. Certificates available to every participant at the finishing line acknowledged the effort not the winning.
Lesson no 5:  I’m a champion for participating and trying hard.  Winning is for one; participating is for everybody.
After the events, families shared picnics, listened to music and mingled. Children could involve themselves in activities set up in the ‘Giving Tent’, where families could meet representatives of the not for profits. The ‘Giving Tent’ was set up to foster a spirit of generosity and participation for social good.
Lesson no 6:  I can enjoy helping others.
The big lesson I learnt today: It’s not the speed but the journey.  There was so much to learn along the way.

TAKING ACTION and a new book on climate change

 

Global competence Taking action

Take Action

What skills and knowledge will it take to go from learning about the world to making a difference in the world? First, it takes seeing oneself as capable of making a difference. Globally competent students see themselves as players, not bystanders. They’re keenly able to recognize opportunities from targeted human rights advocacy to creating the next out-of-the-box, must-have business product we didn’t know we needed. Alone or with others, ethically and creatively, globally competent students can envision and weigh options for action based on evidence and insight; they can assess their potential impact, taking into account varied perspectives and potential consequences for others; and they show courage to act and reflect on their actions.

“We can choose the path of sustainable development” – open letter to world leaders – Action 2015.

Speaking of making a difference by taking action, I had the privilege of writing the teacher notes for Deborah Hart, author and herself a climate campaigner, brings together twelve passionate Australian activists from all walks of life.  Willing to deal with fall-out served up by the government, the courts and the media, these advocates inspire us to follow their lead.

Guarding Eden

Taking action in 2015

Guarding Eden

 

http://asiasociety.org/about

“What do you want to be when you grow up?”

With all due respect to the dancing dolls in Anaheim, it really isn’t a small world.  It is a complex, multifaceted, diverse, and complicated world. Continue reading