What makes a great global project?

As part of Global Leadership Week I’m took my first steps to enter the real time world of connected learning.

I was to start a Twitter Chat on Global Projects  using the hashtag @globalprojects   

Now if you’ve hosted a real time chat you’ll know that countdown time is quite a tense one.  Is everything in place. Will I sound cool? Will I have followers?

But just 15 minutes before my start time I decided to search my hashtag.  Yes, it had already been used, which meant I’d be bringing people into the discussion who would have no idea what I was doing. Mad rush to change that hashtag to … #glopro  This one sounded on trend! Continue reading

Working out loud

You’ve got to love what digital connection and social tools can do.

I recently reached out on LinkedIn to broaden my professional learning network and connected with Ciarra Greene at Portland University, Oregon.  I asked Ciarra about global education and her reply set me thinking.  I had an ‘aha’ moment.  She gave me the missing dots to connect so many ideas rushing about in my head. Ciarra mentioned place-based learning and whilst I understood the concept I had not heard that name.

Place-based learning immerses students in local heritage, cultures, landscapes, opportunities and experiences, using these as a foundation for the study of other learning areas across the curriculum.

I immediately thought of My Place by Nadine Wheatley and the wonderful offerings for learners relating to PLACE.  I’ve wandered from my original pathway!

Ciarra is connected to the Nez Perce tribe, who are an Indigenous people of the plateau, living in the Pacific northwest region of the United States.

Indigenous tribes in the USA are in the news right now, battling Trump’s directive to the Army to continue laying the Dakota Access pipeline across sacred sites with the threat of contaminating drinking water.

What if learners in the United States exchanged their understandings of the traditional cultures of indigenous tribes with learners in Australia and their understandings of the traditional cultures of our First People, the Aborigines?  What if the identity and indeed existence of these indigenous tribes was being threatened?  What if environmental issues are being exploited?

I think Ciarra and I are learning just in the same way we want our young learners to learn-through collaboration, communication and deep thinking.  Through technology, our learning has shot past the four walls of the classroom and entered the biggest ‘classroom’ that is our world.

How amazing!

 

Authentic writing-a pleasure

 

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In an article, Do Students Enjoy Writing? the latest UK data shows that while children and young people’s enjoyment of reading has been increasing in recent years, enjoyment of writing is heading in the opposite direction.  So much so that the National Literacy Trust is now calling for a focus on writing for enjoyment in schools. Results of its sixth annual literacy survey of more than 32 000 eight- to 18-year-olds, released this month, show 44.8 per cent said they enjoy writing very much or quite a lot in 2015 – down from 49.3 per cent the previous year and 10 per cent lower than the 2015 figure for enjoyment of reading.

I pose the question, “How would I respond to this disappointing trend in attitudes to writing?”

What seems lacking is student motivation and engagement.  The enjoyment of writing is greater enhanced by the learner choosing the topic.

Writing in the 21st century has changed and has expanded beyond the genres commonly taught and the development of traditional pieces.  We now need to learning to write in a digital space- to think about using social tools for writing, coding, to write with precision and brevity, sometimes within 140 characters, to write using hyperlinks, to use the skills of curating, archiving and sharing.

How can you create the context to connect your students to a real audience beyond the classroom?  By stimulating curiosity and encouraging learners to envisage a purpose for writing, inspiring learning can be fashioned.

First, you should become familiar with common tools such Twitter, Facebook, Seesaw, Blackboard Collaborate, Edmodo groups, Google docs, Sway, blogposts, WhatsApp, Skype groups, Padlet and Global Projects including Flat Connections.  As educators, we cannot expect to be confident facilitators unless we have some working knowledge of digital tools.

Now for a purpose?  What would learners like to find out?  What do learners wish to say?  Learners easily adapt to online communication to seek answers to their own questions.  Martha Payne, a young school girl from Scotland, started her blog, NeverSeconds as a writing project.  Her blog went viral and involved school children across the globe to write. With a reason to write, learners found their voice and expressed themselves in their unique style.  A global audience is waiting-an audience of varying cultures, ages, faiths, gender, beliefs and experience.

Writing becomes authentic.  This has been measured to increase motivation and engagement.  Success can be shared with the school community as well as with wider audiences.

How can you enrich your learners’ experience of writing with a real audience beyond the classroom?

 

What works for me… and us!

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There are so many exciting experiences happening in classrooms all over the world.  Ordinary teachers doing amazing things with their learners at the heart of each experience-professional learning networks of teachers willing to share in order to strengthen the skills and awareness of their learners.  You’ll find digital and/or global learning examples right here in this posting.    

Colleague, Julie Lindsay, of Flat Connections constructs a learning model whereby all learners have freedom to communicate across borders rather than up or down – with no hierarchy.

On Global Collaboration Day (15th September), experienced global educators and professionals will host connective projects and events. The goals of this whole day event are to demonstrate the power of global connectivity in classrooms, schools and universities around the world, and to introduce others to the tools, resources and projects that are available to educators today. 

Take a look at the active global projects from iEARN. This organisation enables interactive curriculum-based groups to create, research, share opinions and become global citizens.

How can you engage your learners in learning about the world from the world?

 

7 factors that influence globally minded teachers

You’ll be surprised!

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Those teachers who implement wide ranging global programmes are not influenced by their formal teaching programmes and curriculum influences but rather by these factors

 

  1. Family
  2. Exposure to diversity
  3. Minority status
  4. Global education course
  5. Intensive travel
  6. Having a mentor
  7. Professional service

Bethink Global offers a deeper understanding of global education through professional learning and is a support system in the amplification of teachers’ global perspective.  

http://www.bethinkglobal.com.au

Cambodia and Laos-a travelling experience

It wasn’t easy to explain my visit to Cambodia and Laos, in fact I found it tricky to know exactly what I’d be involved with. I wasn’t disappointed in the opportunities to support those with less opportunity in life than I have.  I am truly blessed. Thank you Robyn and Uniting Journeys.

Cambodia

Once upon a time, some years back, I travelled with a slightly cynical perspective. I’d observe and retell, often in humourous guise, the societal and cultural differences I noticed with a view that my ‘world’ was the marker by which everything I saw was measured.
Call it ageing, maturity or just eating humble pie, we in the west have a lot to learn from other cultures and people. My visit to Cambodia and Laos, and in particular, to a village about 30 kms out of Siem Reap, has given me plenty to think about.

I came home with so much more than I took-no not luggage, but learning.  I’ve written entries and will publish them every few days. Watch out for my entries and feel free to comment.

How to build deeper learning

Asia Study Deeper Learning

What does it mean to educate learners for life and work in the global innovative age?

What is meant by global competencies?

What are some ways learners develop perspective and empathy?

The video  at https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/building-global-citizens-asis goes a long way to answering these questions.
Learning that is student centred, project based and authentic is the focus of a series of videos by the Asia Society.

I came across the Asia Society as part of my interest in global learning.  It is a leading educational organization dedicated to promoting mutual understanding and strengthening partnerships among peoples, leaders and institutions of Asia and the United States in a global context.   Asia Link, which is Australia’s leading centre for the promotion of public understanding of the countries of Asia and of Australia’s role in the region, is the key provider of information, training and professional networks. The Asia Society Center (sic) for Global Education and the Asia Education Foundation are the respective education arms of these two organisations.

http://asiasociety.org/

http://asiasociety.org/education/center-global-education

http://asialink.unimelb.edu.au/

http://www.asiaeducation.edu.au/

See also my blog post “How to Build Global Competence”   http://bethinkglobal.com.au/global-competence-building-part-1/

 

 

 

 

Global Societies

Philosopdownloadher, Martha Nussbaum asks, “What makes some societies not only more tolerant of religious and cultural diversity than others, but able to foster respect for difference as a consequence of their understanding of civic freedom?” Continue reading